Transvaginal ultrasounds cause more cellular damage than transabdominal ultrasounds

Transvaginal ultrasounds cause more cellular damage than transabdominal ultrasounds

I wanted to reiterate a point brought up in previous post of:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11776185

Transvaginal ultrasound is closer to the fetus, offers more direct exposure, and is more invasive than transabdominal scanning. As a male I am degrees separated from this, but I would expect at least dinner and a date before this kind of treatment.

The process of transvaginal scanning can be very intrusive, leading to stress. Stress while pregnant has been correlated with a variety of negative health outcomes.

So, aside from being more physically harmful to cellular environments, it is more harmful on a grand scale because of stress (unless the lady is just into that kind of thing with strangers in lab coats)…

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Prenatal ultrasound exposure and association with postnatal hearing outcomes

Prenatal ultrasound exposure and association with postnatal hearing outcomes

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3646553/

In this study, it was investigated whether prenatal ultrasound could lead to hearing loss. They actually found a correlation with successfully passing the hearing tests and number of ultrasound scans.

Although in this study it was found that number of ultrasound scans improved fetal hearing outcomes, that is not the only thing that needs to be considered. -Why- did it improve the outcome?

We need more research.

Effects of diagnostic ultrasound on villus ultrastructure of early pregnancy

Effects of diagnostic ultrasound on villus ultrastructure of early pregnancy

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8758789

Cells can be damaged by diagnostic ultrasound. While I may not know much about the brain, I do know that when building the house the foundation is the most important.

Similarly, early parts of fetal development are sensitive and disturbance could have long term consequences.

If diagnostic ultrasound is capable of causing cellular damage, then the downstream effects of this definitely deserve further investigation.

Abstract
OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the effects of diagnostic ultrasound on villus ultrastructure of early pregnancy.
METHODS:

Using the electron microscopy, the effect of B-mode ultrasound and color Doppler flow image on villus of early pregnancy were studied. 46 cases of early pregnancy women were divided into five groups: Groups 1 : control group; Group II and III: 24 +/- 1 hours after exposure to B mode and color Doppler ultrasound for 30 minutes respectively; Group IV and V: 72 +/- 1 hours after exposure to B mode and color Doppler ultrasound for 30 minutes respectively.
RESULTS:

Expansion of perinuclear space in cytotrophoblasts and syncytiotrophoblasts, enlargement of rough endoplasmic reticulum, and vacuolization in the cytoplasm were found in Group II and III.
CONCLUSIONS:

The present study showed that the main injured sites after exposure to ultrasound were the plasma membrane and suborganelles. These changes disappeared within 3 days.

Influence of sonographic examination on embryo villi during early pregnancy

Influence of sonographic examination on embryo villi during early pregnancy

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11776185

This study reports that transvaginal ultrasound for 10 minutes was detected to disrupt some cellular structures. As well, it was detected that superoxide dismutase(SOD) levels decreased. SOD is an enzyme responsible to getting rid of free radicals.

The conclusion of the paper reads: It is recommended that sonographic examination should be done through abdominal approach for shorter than 10 minutes during early stage of pregnancy.

They surmise transabdominal ultrasound may be safer than transvaginal with this conclusion. This is possible because transvaginal ultrasound is closer to the fetus, offers more direct exposure, and is more invasive than transabdominal scanning. That in itself can be stressful for the lady.

Here’s hoping Scott Walker reads this.

Related articles

Biological effects of diagnostic ultrasound on embryo in first trimester of pregnancy

Biological effects of diagnostic ultrasound on embryo in first trimester of pregnancy

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8001420

When ultrasound passes through certain types of enzymes, depending on the mechanism of reaction involved, it can impart energy.  This energy leads to altered chemical reaction rates (increase/decrease in how many chemical reactions occur given in a certain timeframe).

This has been noted in alpha-amylase and other glycoside hydrolase class enzymes, and also some enzymes involved in transesterification.

Diagnostic ultrasound — which is used for fetal imaging — can alter enzyme activity, too.

In plants, the way ultrasound affects enzymes can change the plant’s lifelong development. Exposure to ultrasound at seed super charges enzymes involved in breaking down starch into nutrients, which is important for the first developing seedling.

It has not been studied how ultrasound’s impact on enzymes affects human development. It should be. We need more research to ensure that routine fetal scanning is not causing unintended harm.

Ultrasound and Autism: Association, Link, or Coincidence?

Ultrasound and Autism: Association, Link, or Coincidence?

http://www.jultrasoundmed.org/content/31/8/1261.abstract

“Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) affect an estimated 1% of children in the United States. The etiology is probably multifactorial, including genetic components and exposure to infections, toxins, and other environmental factors, particularly unfavorable perinatal and neonatal conditions.

There has been an increase in the frequency of diagnosis of ASDs over the last 20 years with a parallel increase in the use of obstetric diagnostic ultrasound, with prenatal ultrasound exposure mentioned as the possible main etiology for autism “epidemics.”

Central nervous system alterations have been described in ASDs, and certain similar changes have been described in animals after exposure to ultrasound. However, analysis of in utero exposure in humans has failed to show harmful effects in neonates or children, particularly in school performance, attention disorders, and behavioral changes.

There is no independently confirmed peer-reviewed published evidence that a cause-effect relationship exists between in utero exposure to clinical ultrasound and development of ASDs in childhood.

Ultrasound is a form of energy with effects in the tissues it traverses, and its use should be restricted to medical indications, by trained professionals, for as short a period and as low an intensity as compatible with accurate diagnosis.”

Practitioners do not record dose during sonograms. This precludes studies the possibility of directly connecting ultrasound and autism. If there is truly a connection, then it will not be found with epidemiology unless it is unforgivably strong.

It worries me a lot. There are too many links between ultrasound and autism for this to be a passing coincidence.

At the very least, more research is urgently needed.

Prenatal ultrasound causes brain damage in mice

Prenatal ultrasound causes brain damage in mice

http://www.pnas.org/content/103/34/12903/F2.expansion.html

According to this study, mouse brains exposed to diagnostic ultrasound grew incorrectly. This is brain damage during development.

Developing brain cells have to migrate from a starting location to a distant one, where they link up to other cells. This study suggests that ultrasonic exposure can disrupt this, knocking cells around and leading to mis-connections.

Coincidentally, the brains of autistic individuals can display issues with interconnectivity and other such similar phenotypes – http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0049172

Side effects like this need further study. Please support the petition at https://www.change.org/petitions/health-risks-of-prenatal-ultrasound-the-urgent-need-for-more-research-and-regulation so further research can be performed on how this affects the health of people.