[Effect of oxytocin on uterine fibroids treated by ultrasound ablation]

[Effect of oxytocin on uterine fibroids treated by ultrasound ablation]

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21781579

OBJECTIVE:
To explore the effect of oxytocin on uterine fibroids treated by ultrasound ablation.

METHODS:
Eighty-two single points in 29 uterine fibroids from 26 patients were sonicated with magnetic resonance imaging guided by high intensity focused ultrasound before and after using oxytocin. The required total energy, sonication time required to reach 60°C and the acoustic energy for increasing 1°C of temperature at the single point before and after using oxytocin were compared.

RESULTS:
Before intravenous infusion of oxytocin, the average total sonication energy required to reach 60°C was (5320 ± 910) J and it took (21 ± 20) seconds for sonicating a single point, the energy required for increasing 1°C was (255 ± 302) J. In contrast, after intravenous infusion of oxytocin, the average total sonication energy required to reach 60°C was (2890 ± 325) J, and it took (12 ± 7) seconds for sonicating a single point, the energy required for increasing 1°C was (126 ± 94) J. Those three index all reached statistical difference (P = 0.002, P = 0.001, P = 0.002, respectively).

CONCLUSION:
It seemed that Oxytocin could significantly decrease the energy required for ablating uterine fibroids, shorten treatment time and improve the treatment efficiency.
PMID: 21781579 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

FetalSonoSafety comments:
Oxytocin increases the receptiveness of cells to external stimuli. Thus, this may increase their reception to sonic energies through a variety of mechanisms.

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Mice Exposed to Diagnostic Ultrasound Exhibit Autistic-Like Social Behaviors

Mice Exposed to Diagnostic Ultrasound Exhibit Autistic-Like Social Behaviors

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24249575
Mice Exposed to Diagnostic Ultrasound In Utero Are Less Social and More Active in Social Situations Relative to Controls.
McClintic AM, King BH, Webb SJ, Mourad PD.
Source

Department Neurological Surgery, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.
Abstract

Clinical use of diagnostic ultrasound imaging during pregnancy has a long history of safety and diagnostic utility, as supported by numerous human case reports and epidemiological studies. However, there exist in vivo studies linking large but clinically relevant doses of ultrasound applied to mouse fetuses in utero to altered learning, memory, and neuroanatomy of those mice. Also, there exists a well-documented significant increase in the likelihood of non-right-handedness in boys exposed to diagnostic ultrasound in utero, potentially relevant given the increased prevalence of autism in males, and reports of excess non-right-handedness in this population. Motivated by these observations, we applied 30 minutes of diagnostic ultrasound to pregnant mice at embryonic day 14.5 and assayed the social behavior of their male pups 3 weeks after their birth. The ultrasound-exposed pups were significantly (P < 0.01) less interested in social interaction than sham-exposed pups in a three-chamber sociability test. In addition, they demonstrated significantly (P < 0.05) more activity relative to the sham-exposed pups, but only in the presence of an unfamiliar mouse. These results suggest that fetal exposure to diagnostic ultrasound applied in utero can alter typical social behaviors in young mice that may be relevant for autism. There exist meaningful differences between the exposure of diagnostic ultrasound to mice versus humans that require further exploration before this work can usefully inform clinical practice. Future work should address these differences as well as clarify the extent, mechanisms, and functional effects of diagnostic ultrasound's interaction with the developing brain. Autism Res 2013, ●●: ●●-●●. © 2013 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

*Note: Mouse models of autism rely on studying symptoms, and are infantile. http://www.nature.com/nrn/journal/v11/n7/full/nrn2851.html

Is Prenatal Sonography Safe? Ep.1: Shortcomings in Epidemiology

This video is a review of what science currently understands about the safety of prenatal ultrasonography.

The short version: medicine does not yet fully understand how ultrasound affects the body, and there has been little research into it. When a practitioner tells you that sonography is perfectly harmless/completely safe, that is not backed by scientific evidence.

Considering that almost every woman in the world gets an ultrasound (or more) during pregnancy, this is unacceptable.

Educate those you care for through social media, share this information about prenatal ultrasound risks to protect their future children

Educate those you care for through social media, share this information about prenatal ultrasound risks to protect their future children

“As a CNM, I frequently have patients upset or disappointed that we don’t do frequent US. I try to explain that US has proven effects on fetus, but it makes little impression on them, since no one has ever heard of this. I agree more research is needed, as well as mainstream education.”
– Michelle Hughes – PFLUGERVILLE, TX

Quote from comments at: https://www.change.org/petitions/health-risks-of-prenatal-ultrasound-the-urgent-need-for-more-research-and-regulation

The past few months have done nothing but emphasize to anyone who is concerned about important issues that mainstream media is a soap opera. They cover what stirs up the most views, and rarely focus on things that matter.

What concerns me grievously about this whole mess with ultrasound is the lack of education. Many people do not even know ultrasound has side effects in the first place. Even practitioners often discount the idea that it can cause harm to a baby, even though scientific evidence offers much evidence to the contrary.

Practitioners are not scientists, they study practice. They are not physicists, although they do look at statistics. Admittedly, it is not their fault for not knowing everything, but now that information about serious safety concerns in their practice is evident, it is time for things to change.

Check out my blog to read about some of these issues, and be sure to sign the petition for better safety and regulation for prenatal sonography. A great number of our species are exposed to it, and our choices with how we handle that, and educate our communities, will directly affect their fate.

Prenatal ultrasound exposure and association with postnatal hearing outcomes

Prenatal ultrasound exposure and association with postnatal hearing outcomes

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3646553/

In this study, it was investigated whether prenatal ultrasound could lead to hearing loss. They actually found a correlation with successfully passing the hearing tests and number of ultrasound scans.

Although in this study it was found that number of ultrasound scans improved fetal hearing outcomes, that is not the only thing that needs to be considered. -Why- did it improve the outcome?

We need more research.

Influence of sonographic examination on embryo villi during early pregnancy

Influence of sonographic examination on embryo villi during early pregnancy

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11776185

This study reports that transvaginal ultrasound for 10 minutes was detected to disrupt some cellular structures. As well, it was detected that superoxide dismutase(SOD) levels decreased. SOD is an enzyme responsible to getting rid of free radicals.

The conclusion of the paper reads: It is recommended that sonographic examination should be done through abdominal approach for shorter than 10 minutes during early stage of pregnancy.

They surmise transabdominal ultrasound may be safer than transvaginal with this conclusion. This is possible because transvaginal ultrasound is closer to the fetus, offers more direct exposure, and is more invasive than transabdominal scanning. That in itself can be stressful for the lady.

Here’s hoping Scott Walker reads this.

Related articles

Biological effects of diagnostic ultrasound on embryo in first trimester of pregnancy

Biological effects of diagnostic ultrasound on embryo in first trimester of pregnancy

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8001420

When ultrasound passes through certain types of enzymes, depending on the mechanism of reaction involved, it can impart energy.  This energy leads to altered chemical reaction rates (increase/decrease in how many chemical reactions occur given in a certain timeframe).

This has been noted in alpha-amylase and other glycoside hydrolase class enzymes, and also some enzymes involved in transesterification.

Diagnostic ultrasound — which is used for fetal imaging — can alter enzyme activity, too.

In plants, the way ultrasound affects enzymes can change the plant’s lifelong development. Exposure to ultrasound at seed super charges enzymes involved in breaking down starch into nutrients, which is important for the first developing seedling.

It has not been studied how ultrasound’s impact on enzymes affects human development. It should be. We need more research to ensure that routine fetal scanning is not causing unintended harm.